These Silent, Eerie Sculptures Look Like They’ve Stepped Out Of A Fairytale

The most recent sculptures by artist Kim Simonsson appear to shimmer with life, as well as the impression is startlingly spooky. His ceramic sculptures depict woods creatures, mostly women, and youngsters but instead of having a smooth, hard surface like a lot of his other bits do, all these are covered in a lively green flocking that makes them appear as if they are covered in moss.

Although a lot of the sculptures depict creatures and youngsters, their mossy appearance makes them appear early.

Although many of the sculptures depict children and animals, their mossy look makes them seem ancient.

Moss Girl

Some are still put in outside settings, where they blend in with moss-covered rocks like apparitions that are otherworldly.

Some are even placed in outdoor settings, where they blend in with moss-covered stones like otherworldly apparitions.

Moss Daughter and River

There is always a somewhat menacing undercurrent in these works, no matter how sweet the subject matter occurs to be.

There's always a slightly menacing undercurrent in these works, regardless of how sweet the subject matter happens to be.

Two-Headed Moss Bunny and Moss Girl

It is outrageous that such a covering that is lively can seem unsettling. Matters are historical and static. Bunnies and these little girls aren’t. “Nothing that’s living remains static long enough to grow moss, however a ceramic figure is frozen in a predicament,” Simonsson says.

Occasionally, other ceramic figures are accompanied by the mossy creatures.

Sometimes, the mossy creatures accompany other ceramic figures.

Lisa and Louise and Moss Bear

The soft, nylon flocking that seems like moss gives these bits, which are now on display in New York, a softer, more organic feeling. “My sculptures are often quite slick and smooth. Pieces [in] Moss People are rougher and much more private. It’s possible for you to see my handprint in them,” Simonsson told TL Magazine.

When it comes to inspiration, Simonsson drew from the paintings of Edvard Munch and the fairytales of Hans Christian Andersen, along with from the Scandinavian folktales he grew up hearing.

In terms of inspiration, Simonsson drew from the fairytales of Hans Christian Andersen and the paintings of Edvard Munch, as well as from the Scandinavian folktales he grew up hearing.

Resting Moss Girl

Sleeping Moss Girl with Ghosts

This bit has a gleaming metal accent.

This piece has a shiny metal accent.

Moss Girl with Visor

(via My Modern Met, TL Magazine)

In the event you are in the New York region, you can see Moss People in person at the Jason Jacques Gallery through October 28. You may also see more of the work of Simonsson on Facebook and his web site.